Review: A History of Glitter and Blood by Hannah Moskowitz

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Title: A History of Glitter and Blood

Author: Hannah Moskowitz

Publication Date: August 18, 2016

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Sixteen-year-old Beckan and her friends are the only fairies brave enough to stay in Ferrum when war breaks out. Now there is tension between the immortal fairies, the subterranean gnomes, and the mysterious tightropers who arrived to liberate the fairies.

But when Beckan’s clan is forced to venture into the gnome underworld to survive, they find themselves tentatively forming unlikely friendships and making sacrifices they couldn’t have imagined. As danger mounts, Beckan finds herself caught between her loyalty to her friends, her desire for peace, and a love she never expected.

This stunning, lyrical fantasy is a powerful exploration of what makes a family, what justifies a war, and what it means to truly love.

I received this book for free via NetGalley in exchange for an honest and unbiased review. Thanks to Chronicle Books.

Ok, this will probably be the hardest review I have ever had to write because this is the weirdest and most confusing book I have read in my entire life. No, I am not exaggerating.

We have fairies, gnomes, and tightropers. There are more creatures in this book, but the book is mainly compromised of these three species. Tightropers live in the sky among all their “ropes,” gnomes live underground, and the fairies (all three of them) live on ground level. While there are pictures that help explain the appearance of the fairies, I still have no idea what the gnomes or the tightropers look like (minus their hands, feet, and mouths – picture provided in book), except for an image I have conjured up in my mind.

This story follows three fairies, two gnomes, and one tightroper. If I leave out any characters, I apologize. I’m still attempting to wrap my head around this book. The story is about a war that is going on between the fairies, gnomes, and tightropers, although the tightropers are supposed to be the ones liberating the fairies from the oppression of the gnomes. The novel follows the war, the end of the war, and the way the city of Ferrum is handling its attempts at civilization once again.

Let me reiterate my point from earlier, this book is weird. I mean as weird as weird can get. Imagine everyone having sex with everyone, fairies carrying around parts of the deceased (who aren’t really dead, but are), gnomes eating fairies, and most jumbled style of writing you will ever come across.

If you are confused, but also understand my review, you just might like this book. While the writing was very disorganized, I didn’t hate it once I got into its rhythm. My biggest complaint was the utter lack of world building. There was SO MUCH the author could have written to make this world beautiful. It was as if the author just wanted to get along with the story and not dally with world building at all. Although didn’t love this book, I didn’t hate it either. It’s definitely a story that will stick with me for a long time.

3 out of 5 stars


Meet The Author

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Hannah Moskowitz wrote her first story, about a kitten named Lilly on the run from cat hunters, for a contest when she was seven years old. She was disqualified for violence. Her first book, BREAK, was on the ALA’s 2010 list of Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, and her book GONE, GONE, GONE won a Stonewall Honor in 2013. She graduated from the University of Maryland in 2013, and now lives in New York City.

You can find her on Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram, and her website.

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